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About Cameron L. Martindell

Cameron L. Martindell is a freelance adventure and expedition writer and photographer who is always “Off Yonder: Seeing the world for what it is.” In addition to writing his own popular blog [offyonder.com], he is a Senior Editor for Elevation Outdoors Magazine [elevationoutdoors.com] and contributes to National Geographic Adventure, Wired Magazine and Backpacker among others.

ALL POSTS BY THIS AUTHOR:

Fall 2013 Snowshoeing Gear Preview

Don’t be distracted by summer. Here’s some great snowshoeing gear presented at the Outdoor Retailer Winter Market show in Salt Lake City to check out for Fall 2013. Gear from: Atlas Snowshoes, Vasque Footwear, TSL Snowshoes, Easton Mtn. Products, Stanley, … Continue reading


Video: 2012 SnowSports Trade Show (SIA)

The SIA Snow Show was in Denver again and as always, all the toys needed to play and have fun in the snow were on display. Check out the video to hear some of the exhibitors talk about what they … Continue reading


Arapaho Pass, Colorado: Perfect for Day Trips and Multi-day Snowshoe Treks

Arapaho Pass - Cameron L. Martindell/offyonder.com

Down in the lowlands, it may seem silly to consider snowshoeing when there are traces, if any, snow on the ground. But it’s worth being savvy to what’s going on in the mountains and getting out in the early season. … Continue reading


Sherpa Adventure Gear – A Review of the Shankar Jacket

No, you don’t always need down. And for that matter, you don’t always want down. For the enthusiastic snowshoer who wants to get out in the snow in the early season or stay out well into the spring, conditions might … Continue reading


Snowshoeing Talkeetna in Alaska

The sky was flat and overcast, typical for April in South Central Alaska. “You just missed miles of blue sky and views of Denali by a few days.” Howard, from Alaska Nature Guides noted. It turns out March is the … Continue reading


Crow Creek Gold Mine, Girdwood, Alaska

Old places, while, often charming any time, become particularly enchanting in the snow. We drove from Girdwood, Alaska a little further into the Chugach mountains to the Crow Creek Gold Mine. While not entirely abandoned, operations here have diminished substantially. … Continue reading


Marmot Zion Jacket: A Stalwart Polartec Shell for Snowshoeing in Alaska

This is a technical jacket. The core specifications – Polartec's new NeoShell fabric, taped seams, storm hood – are impressive. But most importantly it performs well. As with anything new, it's a little stiff when you first put it on, but that concern quickly fades away as the totally bomber nature of the Zion is realized. While you're still standing in the store trying it on, you are transported to icy crags and powder days.


The Outdoor Retailer Summer Market 2011 Wrap-up

While snowsports - ergo snowshoeing related - products were mostly absent in Salt Lake City for the Outdoor Retailer Summer Market 2011, a few gems were still lurking around to be found.


Atlas History X

When Perry Klebahn presented his innovative snowshoe design as a graduate engineering thesis at Stanford University's product design program, he was awarded the first patent for snowshoes in more than 40 years. On the basis of that patent, Klebahn founded the Atlas Snow-Shoe Company with Jim Klingbeil in 1990, a year before he graduated.


Snowshoeing by Moonlight: Brainard Lake, Colorado

The smell of mulled wine and spicy hot coco was a distant and coveted memory when the doors to the car opened and an icy blast of wind blew through. A near full moon lit up the snow-covered world around us. The stars that could shine through the moonbeams, like those in Orion, sparkled above as we hunched over, backs to the wind, to strap on our snowshoes.


Trans-Sierra or Bust!

Snowshoe Magazine
The Sierra Nevada Mountain Range in California has truly been blessed this year with record snowfall. With that in mind, some colleagues at the Atlas Snow-Shoe Co. came up with the wild idea to do a traditional skiing route across the Sierra Nevada on snowshoes. While this was admittedly for our own personal fun, we could justify it as a work trip to test the snowshoes.