SNOWSHOE MAGAZINE FEATURED ARTICLE:

Is Snowshoeing a Panacea for Anxiety and Depression?

There have been studies done about exercise intervention to clinical populations diagnosed with depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and even post traumatic stress disorder. This research shows that there are beneficial effects that produce a statistically relevant and significant reduction in these mental maladies.

In the 4th century, Plato reportedly quipped, “For man to succeed in life he has been provided with two means, education and physical activity. Not separately, one for the soul and the other for the body, but for the two together. With these two means, man can attain perfection.”

The CDC cites health benefits associated with a range of physical activity and in its absence there can be an increased risk of obesity, heart disease, diabetes, certain cancers, etc. Physical inactivity may also be associated with the development of mental disorders such as those listed above.

There is evidence for the effectiveness of exercise training in patients with panic disorder impacted by a number of psychological factors such as increased self efficacy, a sense of mastery, distraction, and changes of self-concept. Can or will psychologists prescribe such an exercise intervention as part of therapy for their patients? It would seem to integrate perfectly with cognitive behavioral therapy strategies such as situational analysis, self monitoring, homework activities, and supportive follow-up to help compliance.

Physical fitness will also improve self-esteem and as patients feel better about themselves they’ll develop a more optimistic and energetic frame of mind. There is also an association between aerobic exercise and increased alertness. The exercise improves circulation and increases the availability of oxygen to the brain while it also causes the body to produce chemicals such as adrenaline to promote mental alertness.

Fitness can instill a sense of pride and confidence and allow the mind a pathway to escape from everyday stress. Biologically speaking, exercise is said to cause the brain to release beta endorphins, which are essential in relieving pain and create a sort of euphoric or light happy feeling. This overall mood enhancement can be prescribed to help treat depression and anxiety. Regular exercise will also invoke focus, determination, and discipline, which are mentally strengthening.

Snowshoeing is one of the top forms of aerobic recreational activities. And aerobic activities have been found to promote mental health, boost energy, improve sleep, relieve tension and stress, and combat anxiety and depression. There is a real proven link between physical fitness and mental health and well-being.  We should get moving on this!

How do we encourage more psychologists to enroll their patients in outdoor fitness endeavors as part of therapy? There will be benefits from such strategies at a wide range of levels from getting someone out on rental snowshoes for three short weekly hikes to training for a 50 km cross country ski-athon.

If you are a snowshoe guide or a snowshoe rental outlet, put together a strategy (creating a prescription for a routine for snowshoeing a number of kilometers a few times per week) and contact professionals and clinics to see if they’ll talk with you about employing and taking advantage of your idea to incorporate snowshoeing in their patient therapy. It will be incremental business and you’ll be helping people in need.

Roger Lohr is the writer/editor for XCSkiResorts.com

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About Roger Lohr, XCSkiResorts.com

Roger Lohr lives in Lebanon, NH and has published content about snowshoeing, XC skiing, sustainability and more. He loves to cross country ski and snowshoe on trails and in the backcountry, and snowboarding in powder. He owns and edits XCSkiResorts.com and is the cross country skiing and snowshoe editor at SeniorsSkiing.com and SnoCountry.com. He also is the Outdoor Recreation Editor at Green Energy Times and contributes to many other media outlets.