SNOWSHOE MAGAZINE FEATURED ARTICLE:

The Art of Discipline

What is Discipline? Does discipline have anything to do with success or motivation? Does discipline have anything to do with your everyday life? Can discipline be an effective habit?

Discipline is defined as a commitment to the most important person in the world – YOU. It means doing what you have to do, even when you don’t want to do it.

Discipline is an effective habit and effective habits lead to effective results. Conversely, ineffective habits produce ineffective results. Firstly, you must discipline yourself to seek awareness and rid yourself of ineffective habits. Then, by utilizing discipline, replace those ineffective habits with useful and productive ones. By doing so, you can achieve anything you want in life.

Discipline, along with a positive attitude, is within your control. Don’t allow those ineffective habits to control you and your future. Instead, discover how daily discipline will eventually alter any negative habits and change your life for the better. Go ahead and make the decision to lead a disciplined life and reap the benefits.

Discipline is 100 percent within your control. Take the first letter in the word Discipline – D – and give it the numerical value of four. Then, take each of the following letters in DISCIPLINE and give each letter its respective numerical value. Add all the letter values and take note that the sum equals 100. If you want to increase your performance by 100 percent, then, put discipline in the driver’s seat.

Discipline is an effective habit. Discipline is a complete process, which includes personal awareness, desire, determination, recognition and reward.

Personal behavior is a part of discipline. Once a meticulous behavior is recognized and rewarded, it gets repeated. The process is simple. You determine the necessary behavior or action required to achieve the goal; do it even when you don’t want to; and finally, recognize and reward that behavior so it will be repeated.

Allow me to share the discipline in my life.

Years ago, I realized I am most productive in the morning, and classify myself as a “morning person”. I used to get up at 6 a.m. every morning. Then I had a thought: Why not get up one hour earlier and dedicate that hour as the most productive time for the most important person in the world – ME? I wondered about the outcome of this simple change.

Over the next month, I got up at 5 a.m. and dedicated one hour to me. I called it “me time” and my objective was to do something for me that will help me achieve my goals. That hour is quite special for me now and also, very satisfying. “Me time” is both my discipline and an effective habit.

Now, here is the secret to making “me time” a discipline and an effective habit. When I used to get up at 6 a.m., I immediately enjoyed a cup of tea. However, following my decision to begin “me time” at 5 a.m., I decided not to have tea upon waking, but to wait until “me time” ended. My first cup of tea became my reward for doing what I said I was going to do.

Well, the discipline did not stop there. I believe in physical fitness to maintain good health and well being. Therefore, after my tea, I venture out for a walk, ride my exercise bike, or go snowshoeing (when the weather cooperates) for an hour.

What do you think my reward is for exercising?

Yes, breakfast! My daily routine begins with a shower, getting dressed and preparing for a day of patient care. Can you imagine how I feel and how I perform for the remainder of the day, based on all I have accomplished before leaving home?

I always feel wonderful and I am truly satisfied with my performance. I permit myself to do something rewarding just for me. I can, in turn, do something special for my patients.

Statistics stipulate it takes 21 days to develop a habit. Rest assured, that my “me time” discipline and subsequent, reward is a definite habit. And that first cup of tea tastes better than ever before.

Take the time to reflect on your most productive time of day. Once you determine that time, fully utilize one hour of your most productive time and reward yourself upon completion. In no time, you will be disciplined and will achieve the things you thought were impossible in your life.

Remember, both attitude and discipline are within your control. They are the foundation for ongoing self-motivation and personal success. Recognize and reward appropriate behaviors and you will enjoy effective habits and valuable disciplines. You are well on your way to where you want to go.

Dr. Paul Burns is a Chiropractor specializing in pain management and sports injuries.  He has worked with many college and pro teams, including the Denver Broncos, the ATP and Wrangler Sports.  His multidisciplinary practice is located in the Denver Tech Center and offers the latest in evidenced based practice methodology, techniques and technology.

For more information, visit www.DrPaulBurns.com and/or call 303-694-9759. 

This entry was posted in Features by Dr. Paul Burns. Bookmark the permalink.

About Dr. Paul Burns

Dr. Paul Burns is a Chiropractor specializing in pain management and sports injuries. He has worked with many college and pro teams, including the Denver Broncos, the ATP and Wrangler Sports. His multidisciplinary practice is located in the Denver Tech Center and offers the latest in evidenced based practice methodology, techniques and technology. For more information, visit www.DrPaulBurns.com and/or call 303-694-9759.